logo

Building Technology

logo

Contents

BackLane Realty Home Page
BackBuyers Information
BackNewsletter

bar

ToPTraditional Queensland Building Styles

Many people dream of owning an historic Queenslander style home. But what is a “Queenslander”? The term is generally used to describe any home constructed of timber with an iron roof, but technically it refers to homes built in the 1920 -1940 period with a gable roof over the covered, projecting, and often screened in, entry porch.

What differentiates a cottage from a house? For most of us the term “Cottage” means a small and pretty little home. Originally a cottage meant a house with a core of 4 rooms. A house had a core of more than 4 rooms.

“Colonial” is normally used to describe any spacious house with verandahs, but strictly speaking it refers to homes built of timber and tin prior to 1901. Many of these nineteenth century homes were “single skin” - meaning that they were built with only one thickness of timber between you and the outside world. The timber was usually tongue and grooved and fixed to the inside of the frame. It is also referred to as an „exposed-stud-frameš. These houses may be cute, but they are a bit low on the insulation scale.

A "Bungalow" is a single-storey house, often with overhanging roof, broad eaves and verandahs.

The "Federation" style home was popular from the 1890's to about 1910 and generally refers to the Queen Anne style of architecture. Most Federation style homes on Tamborine Mountain were built between 1920 and 1930.

bar

ToPBuilding Terminology

This section explains some of the many terms used to describe building styles, especially those applicable to the range of homes we normally call Queenslanders.

Acroteria
Decorative galvanised iron pieces attached to the corners of roof guttering
Architrave
The moulding around a door or window
Attached
Two or more structures joined together by a common wall
Attic
A room within the roof of a building
Awning
A light or temporary roof with open sides

ToPB...

Bagging
The process of applying thin mortar to a masonry wall with a coarse material such as hessian
Balcony
A cantilevered or bracketed platform projecting from a wall with access from an upper storey
Bargeboard
A sloping board fixed to the edge of a gable roof, often decorated by fretwork or similar artistry
Bay
A projection from the outside wall, forming a bow window if curved, a faceted window or bay if angled, an oriel window if suspended above ground level, or a conical bay if its roof is cone-shaped
Beam
A large horizontal support - may be of solid timber, laminated timber or steel
Bearers
The main beams above the foundation level which support the joists and floor
Belvedere
A small open platform, roofed over, and located on top of the roof to provide a view.
Boards
Dressed lengths of timber used for cladding the frame - walls, floor and ceiling. There are many different types.
Board-and-batten
Wall cladding of shot-edge boards with the joints covered by timber battens.
Bow
A curved shape such as a bay window
Brace or Bracing
A structural member fix at an angle to horizontal or vertical members, e.g. cross-bracing on timber walls.
Brackets
Supports, often curved and decorative, beneath a horizontal member.
Breezeway
A roofed over, and usually open sided, passageway between 2 detached structures.
Bressummer
A beam spanning a wide opening and supporting the superstructure, e.g. across a stairwell.
Broken-back roof
A roof that changes from a steep straight pitch to a lower pitch without any step.
Bullnose
A convex or curve over, which becomes sharper towards the edge, e.g. a bullnose roof
Bungalow
A single storey house, usually with overhanging roof, broad eaves and verandahs
Bungalow roof
A roof which pitches straight and continuously from the apex (ridge) to the edge on one or more sides.
Butterfly-roof
A roof which changes from a steep downward pitch to an upward one, like the wings of a butterfly.

ToPC...

Casement
A window hinged on one of its vertical sides to open inwards or outwards like a door
Cavity-wall (also called Cavity Brick)
A brick wall laid in 2 close rows which are connected by ties
Chair-rail (often called Dado-rail)
A horizontal moulding at chairback height to protect the wall
Chamfer
A surface made by shaving the right-angled edge of timber or other material at 45 degrees
Chamferboards
Exterior wall cladding of horizontal boards with a recess along top and bottom edges so that each board fits neatly over the other
Cornice
A horizontal moulding projecting from the top of an external wall or decorating the junction of the internal wall and the ceiling
Course
A horizontal layer of some material, especially bricks
Cresting
A decorative piece along the top of a wall or roof, e.g. filigree cast iron along the ridge
Cross-brace
Two pieces of timber or steel crossing each other as braces for walls

ToPD...

Dado
The lower part of an internal wall, below chair-rail height, when decorated differently from the upper part.
Dentils
A decorative row of small blocks like teeth along the cornice or fascia
Dormer
A window with a small roof and sides projecting from a larger sloping roof
Dove-tail
A neat joint between two timbers, the wedge-shaped projections along one edge slotting into the same shaped sockets of the other

ToPE...

Eaves
The lower edge of a roof beyond the wall, called close eaves if not projecting far and boxed eaves if lined underneath

ToPF...

Finial
A carved or moulded ornament, usually pointed, at the top of an apex of a structure, e.g. a gable or parapet.
Fingerplate
A small oblong plate, usually of china or metal, fixed behind a door handle or lock for decoration and protection
Foliated
A leaf-like decoration (usually carved)
French Doors
A pair of casement windows serving as doors, traditionally glazed above and panelled below, but nowadays usually all glass
Fretwork
Apattern of interlaced, geometric openwork decoration, usually cut in thin timber by means of a fret-saw, and sometimes made of metal
Frieze
A continuous band of decoration across the top of a building, or the top of an internal wall between the ceiling and picture-rail

ToPG...

Gable
The upper triangular part of an external wall at the end of a double-pitched roof
Gable-roof
A double pitched roof, sloping straight from the ridge to the eaves on two sides, with a gable on the other two sides
Gargoyle
A grotesque spout projecting from a building to carry off rainwater
Gazebo
A small tower or summerhouse, usually in a garden
Grille column - a flat decorative verandah support of cast or wrought iron

ToPH...

Herringbone-strut
Two small pieces of timber crossing each other to separate joists.
Hinge housing
The area chiselled to make a hinge sit flush with the timber
Hipped-roof
A roof which is pitched on all 4 sides from the ridge to the eaves
Hipped-gable (also called Half-hipped, Kentish gable)
A gabled-roof with the top of the gable sliced off to form a small hip at the end

ToPI...

Ingle-nook (Cosy corner)
A room recess, usually with a built-in seat and an open fire

ToPJ...

Japan
Dark varnish like Japanese lacquer, often applied to floorboards and door hardware
Joists
Horizontal timbers to which flooring or ceiling is fixed
Juliet balcony
A small roofed balcony as at the gable end of an attic

ToPK...

Keystone
The wedge-shaped central piece of an arch

ToPL...

Lath and plaster
Thin strips of wood nailed to interior surfaces such as studs and ceiling joists and covered with plaster
Leadlight
Decorative glazing using small rectangular, diamond or other shaped pieces of glass, often coloured, and set in lead strips
Lintel
A horizontal beam spanning an opening
Lobby
Found in Interwar housing, now usually called an entry foyer
Louvre
A horizontal arrangement of overlapping and downward slanting timber or glass slats to admit air but exclude rain (often floor to ceiling in tropical climates)

ToPM..

Malthoid
A bituminous membrane for covering low roofs or floors in the inter war period
Mansard-roof
Double-pitched roof sloping from ridge to eaves on 2 sides, but in 2 different planes with the lower being the steeper and a vertical wall on the other 2 sides
Mantlepiece
Decorative structure around and above a fireplace, usually includes a mantleshelf for displaying decorative items
Masonry
Originally construction by a mason in stone, but expanded to include brick, concrete block and fibro
Mitre
A diagonal joint formed by 2 pieces of timber meeting at an angle
Modillions
Blocks or brackets supporting a cornice or eaves (also known as dentils)
Mortice-and-tenon
A neat join between 2 timbers, one with a socket to receive the matching projecting end of the other, to make a firm connection without the need for nailing. The piece with the socket is called a female and the piece with the projecting end is called a male.
Moulding
A band or strip along a surface or joining 2 surfaces, such as an architrave around a door or window, a cornice where the wall and ceiling meet or a skirting where wall and floor meet.

ToPN..

Newel
The upright post of a staircase which supports the handrail - often turned and decorated
Nogging
Either infill of masonry laid as panels between a timber wall-frame or small horizontal pieces of timber fixed between the wall studs

ToPO..

Ogee
S-shaped or double curve comprising a convex and a concave section, often seen in decorative archways
Oriel
A bay window suspended above ground

ToPP..

Palings
Broad, split or sawn, upright timbers of a fence, e.g. pickets
Panelling
The covering of an interior surface with timber, usually as a series of sheets fixed between framing members, called wainscoting if limited to the lower part of the wall
Parapet
A wall built higher than the eaves line of a roof - often ornately decorated with balustrades
Party-wall
A common wall that divides two attached buildings such as terrace houses and modern duplexes - usually of masonry and extending across the front verandah as a firewall
Patio
A large paved outdoor living area
Pavilion
A room originally built into the corner of a verandah - e.g. a bathroom or laundry
Pediment
A decorative gabled or curve-topped feature above a portico - often of timber fretwork
Pergola
An open trellis like frame attached to a building and / or supported by posts - used for climbing plants
Pickets
Thin verticals in a fence - often with decoratively shaped tops and usually of sawn timber
Picture rail
A horizontal moulding fixed to the walls below the ceiling height and shaped to take metal hooks from which to hang art and photos
Piers
Solid columns supporting a building from ground level - traditionally solid masonry, but now including both steel and timber

To be continued...

bar

pointer Home
bar
Lane Realty
For Service With a Smile
Shop 10, Tamborine Plaza, Beacon Road,
North Tamborine, Queensland, Australia 4272
Logo
Phone61-7-55451800 Fax 61-7-55452747 emailinfo@lanerealty.com.au
Counter

Mouse Copyright © 1997-2010, Graham Information Security and Management Services
This site or any of its contents are not to be reproduced without permission.
Last updated 3 January, 2009